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NEGATIVE NO.94-82141-14

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Author:

National broadcasting company, inc.

Title:

35 hours a day!

Place:

[New York]

Date:

[1 937]

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COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES PRESERVATION DIVISION

BIBLIOGRAPHIC MICROFORM TARGET

MASTER NEGATIVE «

ORIGINAL MATERIAL AS FILMED - ZXISTING BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD

BUSINESS

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VERY day in the year, each of two great coast-to-coast networks NBC Blue and NBC Red fill 171^ hours with the world's most complete schedule of all-star-studded entertainment, up-to-the-minute news, and informative educational features, a total of I 2,8 10 hours during 1936 (5 1,000 programs). Nor does this include all the network program production time, for hours and programs vary in the different zones. The overall minimum average for each of the networks is 17 j/^ hours. 35 hours a day devoted to giving 24,000,000 radio families the greatest number of the most popular programs free for the tuning.

NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY

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Copyright. 1937. National Broadcasting Company. Inc. Lithographed in U.S.A.

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Three hundred and sixty-five days a year, your radio is awake from early morning into the small hours. At finger-touch, it brings entertainment, information, inspiration. This book tells a little of what lies behind.

^TpHE National Broadcasting Company ^ thinks in terms of a "program-day," made up of what may be heard hour by hour over 117 stations on two NBC net- works; a total of more than fifty thousand individual programs yearly. These pages suggest the scope and diversity of NBC broadcast service to the nation.

The pattern of the NBC program-day is woven from endless aspects of all the things that interest people. Events, science, educa- tion, religion, art are reflected in the daily program array. Music in its every expres- sion, discussion of topics grave or gay, drama that brings smiles or tears, news from around the corner or across the seas to achieve this daily broadcast presentation, thousands plan for the millions who listen.

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Nothing can be left to chance. Features to fill each unit of air time must be thought-

fully conceived and diligently executed. Pro- gram chiefs and their lieutenants, musical supervisors and directors, production man- agers, continuity writers, engineers and technical experts who order the amazing mechanism of the ether waves these and many more join to build and disseminate the NBC radio contribution.

And back of this planning and performance operate the knowledge and experience of the Radio Corporation of America first in radio in the United States; radio leader the world over. For besides its own facilities, NBC as "A Radio Corporation of America Service" has at its command the research and manufacturing resources and the globe- ranging communications of RCA.

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So here is a glimpse across the NBC pro- gram parade of thirty-five hours a day three hundred and sixty-five days a year!

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Three hundred and sixty-five days a year, your radio is awake from early morning into the small hours. At finger-touch, it brings entertainment, information, inspiration. This book tells a little of what lies behind.

nr^HE National Broadcasting Company ^ thinks in terms ot a "program-day," made up ot what may he heard hour hy hour over 117 stations on two NBC net- works; a total of more than fifty thousand individual programs yearly. 'I'hese pages suggest the scope and diversity of NBC broadcast service to the nation.

The pattern of the NBC program-day is woven from endless aspects of all the things that interest people. Events, science, educa- tion, religion, art are reflected in the daily program array. Music in its every expres- sion, discussion of topics grave or gay, drama that brings smiles or tears, news from around the corner or across the seas to achieve this daily broadcast presentation, thousands plan for the millions who listen.

Nothing can be left to chance. Features to fill each unit of air time must be thought-

fully conceived and tliligentl\- executed. IVo- gram chiefs and their lieutenants, !nusical supervisors ami directors, proiiuction man- agers, continuity writers, engineers and technical experts who order the amazing mechanism of the ether waves these and many more join to build and disseminate the NBC radio contribution.

And back of this planning and performance operate the knowledge and experience of tlie Radio Corporation of America rirst m radio in the United States; radio leader the world over. For besides its own facilities, NBC as "A Radio Corporation u{ America Service" has at its command the research and manufacturing resources ami the globe- ranging communications of RCA.

So here is a glimpse across the NBC pro- gram parade of thirty-five hours a day - three hundred and sixtv-five da\ s a \ earl

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WHEN the command "Up Ship!" sent the Zeppelin "Hindenburg," world's largest airship, soaring skyward in Germany on its first voyage to the United States, NBC was the only American radio organization represented on board. Like the initial flight of the "China Clipper" and the U. S. Army-National Geographic Society Stratosphere Flight (both events also covered exclusively by NBC), this voyage marked another milestone in aviation the inaugu- ration of regular airship service from Germany to the United States. Ort/y NBC was there!

NBC's Mobile Unit was on the job {above and left) to bring first greet- ings from officers and passengers to American listeners as the "Hin- denburg" landed at Lakehurst, N. J. {At right) Dr. Hugo Eckener, pioneer in Zeppelin transportation and construction, is mobbed for an interview by reporters at Lakehurst.

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As the "Hindenburft" roared over the Atlantic, NBC broadcast regular programs, including a piano concert from mid-ocean, under direc- tion of Max Jordan, NBC's Continental Euro- pean representative (abave).

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TT7HEN the command "ITp Ship!" sent the Zeppelin "Hindenhurg," world's largest airship, soaring skyward in (iermany on its first voyage to the United States, NBC was the only American radio organization represented on board. Like the initial fiight of the "China Clipper" and the U. S. Army-National (Geographic Society Stratosphere Flight (both events also covered exclusively by NBC), this voyage marked another milestone in aviation the inaugu- ration of regular airship service from (iermany to the United States. On/y NBC was there!

NBC's Mobile Unit was on the ioh {above and left) to bring first greet- ings from officers and passengers to American listeners as the "liin- denburg" landed at I.akehurst, N. J. {At right) Dr. Hugo Eckener, pioneer in Zeppelin transportation and construction, is mobbed for an interview by reporters at Lakehurst.

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"Ears" at the Opera for millions of radio listeners microphones in the footlights and high up in the proscenium catch every note of artist and orchestra while the NBC produc- tion man follows the score and signals the en- gineer for a change in volume.

From the famous sound-proofed Box 44 in the Golden Horseshoe at the Metropolitan, Marcia Davenport, NBC's opera commentator, and Milton Cross, NBC announcer, discuss the music and action of each broadcast opera.

EVERY Saturday afternoon millions of listen- ers tune their radios to their local NBC sta- tions for three full hours of the world's finest mu- sic. The pinnacle of opera performances direct from the stage of New York's famed Metropolitan Opera House comes to them only through NBC. . . . For the past six years the National Broadcast- ing Company alone has brought its listeners this glittering parade of the world's outstanding voices in masterful music brilliantly presented.

In its present season, the Opera is sponsored by the Radio Corporation of America. In addition, the Metropolitan Opera Auditions under the direction of Edward Johnson are presented exclu- sively for NBC audiences on Sunday, sponsored by Sherwin-Williams Company.

NBC's technical broadcast "maestros" at the Opera production men and engineer bal- ance and blend the music volume of singer* and orchestra to bring perfect reception to NBC Blue Network listeners.

INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE

"Ears" at the Opera for millions of radio listeners microphones in the footlights and hifth up in the proscenium catch every note of artist and orchestra while the \RC produc- tion man follows the score and signals the en- gineer for a change in volume.

From the famous sound-proofed Box 44 in the Golden Horseshoe at the Metropolitan, Marcia Davenport, NBC's opera commentator, and Milton Cross, NBC announcer, discuss the music and action of each broadcast opera.

I VERY Saturday afternoon millions of listen- ers tune their radios to their local NBC sta- tions for three full hours of the world's finest mu- sic. The pinnacle of opera performances direct from the stage (jf Xew "York's famed Metropolitan Opera House comes to them only through NBC. . . . Vor the jKist six years the National Broadcast- ing Company alone has brought its listeners this glittering parade of the world's outstanding voices in masterful music brilliantly presented.

In its present season, the Opera is sponsored by the Radio Corporation of America. In addition, the Metrojiolitan Opera Auditions under the direction of Kdward Johnson are presented exclu- sively for NBC audiences on Sunday, sponsored by Sherwin-Williams Company.

NBC's technical broadcast "maestros" at the Opera production men and engineer bal- ance and blend the music volume of singers and orchestra to bring perfect reception to NBC Blue Network listeners.

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Charles Butterworth {Packard) Amos 'n' Andy {Pepsodent)

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Bob Bums and his "bazooka" {Kraft)

ACCORDING to our mythical "laugh- ' meter, "more titters, chuckles, chortles, and downright "belly-laughs" were broad- cast over NBC Blue and Red Networks during 1936 than ever before. Old favorites returned with new gags that loosed gales of guffaws. Newcomers endeared themselves to audiences with new slants on the ridiculous. Comedy singles, duos, and full stage pro- ductions drew talent and names from every corner of the country as wise-cracks, gimmicks and nifties were quoted and re- quoted wherever men gathered and women chatted. Here are a few of your favorites. Can you fit their gags to their faces?

Lum and Abner {Horlick's)

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Mr. & Mrs. Goodman Ace (Easy Aces)(i4niicin;

{Lejt) Colonel Stoopnagle and Budd {Minute Tapioca)

Honeyboy and Sassafras {NBC)

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Charles Butterworth (Packard) Amos 'n' Andy Pepsodent)

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Bob Burns and his "bazooka" (Kraft)

C COR DING to our mythical "laugh- i 1. meter, "more titters, chuckles, chortles, ami downright "belly-laughs" were broad- cast over NBC Blue and Red Networks during I9.>6 than ever before. Old favorites returned with new gags that loosed gales of guffaws. Newcomers endeared themselves to audiences with new slants on the ridiculous. C^omedy singles, duos, and full stage pro- ductions drew talent and names from every corner ot the country as wise-cracks, gimmicks ami nifties were quoted and re- quoted wherever men gathered and women chatted. Here are a few of your favorites. Can you fit their gags to their faces?

Lum and Abner (Hor lick's)

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1 O^/C set an all-time high for outstanding NBC A >^*JvJ sport broadcasts 34% greater than 1935 350 hours of broadcast time devoted to special sports and sports topics. Football, baseball, boxing, racing, golf, ten- nis, track amateur and professional NBC was there! Two of the most discussed sports events of the year the Rose Bowl football game at Pasadena and the Louis- Schmeling fight were NBC exclusives!

INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE

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STANFORD T-SOITIIKRN MF.THODIST 0 Paulman. Stanford quarterback, scores the winning touchdown. 100,000 fans from far and near jammed the Rose Bowl (above) to catch this thrilling moment; NBC listen- ers "saw" it from easy chairs.

I/A'^X.set an all-time high for oursranding \BC .X*^Jv/ sport broadcasts ,>4^ , greater than 19^,5 ^^50 hours of broadcast time devoted to special sports and sports topics. Football, baseball, boxing, racing, golf, ten- nis, track amateur antl professional NIK' was there! Two of the most discussei.1 sports events of the year -the Rose Bowl football game at Pasadena and the Louis- Schmeling hght were XHC exclusi\es!

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OWN meetin* tonight! Town meetin' tonight!" As the Town Crier's call fades, "America's Town Meeting" is on the air. Under the auspices of the League for Political Education, distinguished authori- ties of opposing viewpoints present subjects of na- tional significance, with the audience participating a real town meeting, voted 1936's best educational program by the Women's National Radio Committee.

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Men and women alike present their view- points at "America's Town Meeting" and good-naturedly answer the sometimes vio- lent but sincere queries of the more deter- mined members of the audience.

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"Fair Harvard, thy sons to thy Jubilee throng ^" Hundreds of alumni and their guests returned to Har- vard College to celebrate the 300th Anniversary of its founding and NBC was there to bring the color and excitement, and the addresses of distinguished alumni and guests, to Harvard men the world over. The broadcasts of this historical event brought to the radio audience one of 1936's most memorable programs.

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(Above) Academic procession marching into Tercentenary Theatre during exercises Sep- tember 18, 1936. (Right) President James B. Conant delivers Tercentenary oration from rostrum. (Below) Fireworks light up Charles River during Undergraduate Celebration, Sep- tember 17. Harvard School of Business Admin- istration in background.

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In 1836 on the occasion of Harvard's Bicentennial, Josiah Quincy, President, sealed this package and inscribed it, "To be opened by the President of Harvard College in the year 1936, and not before." Opening the package was one of the most interesting ceremonies of the Tercentenary. In the pres- ence of Harvard alumni officers and college officials. Presi- dent Conant revealed its contents, a collection of letters written by Harvard alumni in 1836.

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^OWN meetin* tonight! Town meetin* tonight!" As the Town Crier's call fades, "America's Town Meeting" is on the air. Under the auspices of the League for Political Education, distinguished authori- ties of opposing viewpoints present subjects of na- tional significance, with the audience participating a real town meeting, voted 1936's best educational program by the Women's National Radio Committee.

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"Fair Harvard, thy sons to thy Jubilee throng—" Hundreds of alumni and their guests returned to Har- vard College to celebrate the jooth Anniversary of its founding -and NBC was there to bring the color and excitement, and the addresses of distinguished alumni and guests, to Harvard men the world over. The broadcasts of this historical event brought to the radio audience one of 1936's most memorable programs.

In 1836 on the occasion of Harvard's Bicentennial, Josiah Ouincy, President, sealed this package and inscribed it. "To be opened by the President of Harvard Collej^e in the year 1936, and not before." Opening the package was one of the most interesting ceremonies of the Tercentenary. In the pres- ence of Harvard alumni officers and college officials. Presi- dent Conant revealed its contents, a collection of letter* written by Harvard alumni in 1836.

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(Above) Academic procession marching into Tercentenary Theatre during exercises Sep- tember 18, 1936. (Right) President James B. Conant delivers Tercentenary oration from rostrum. (Below) Fireworks light up Charles River during Undergraduate Celebration, Sep- tember 17. Harvard School of Business Admin- istration in background.

Men and women alike present their view- points at "America's Town Meeting" and good-naturedly answer the sometimes vio- lent but sincere queries of the more deter- mined members of the audience.

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(L«/r) Bruno Walter, noted conductor of several concert broadcasts in 1936, takes a curtain call with featured members of the cast of "Don Giovanni."

In NBC*8 Radio City Studios, Dr. Damrosch conducts the NBC Symphony Orchestra {above) and explains the compositions; and in more than 70,000 radio-equipped schools, pu- pils listen attentively each Friday to his Music Appreciation Hour, an important part of their musical education.

At a luncheon in honor of his 75th birthday given by David SamoflF, president of RCA, Dr. Damrosch was at his happiest when these youngsters gathered about him.

THE Music Appreciation Hour, an exclusive NBC feature conducted by Dr. Walter Damrosch, is without doubt the most widely heard musical educa- tion program for school children. It is re- quired listening for some 7,000,000 stu- dents who follow the weekly "lessons" guided by notebooks and manuals sup- plied to the schools by NBC's Music Education Department and heard by half again as many adult listeners.

The love of fine music, encouraged by this and similarly constructive educa- tional periods, is increasing the audience for such important programs as the Salz- burg Music Festival, described on the preceding page. So great is the demand for better music that the time devoted to classical compositions on NBC programs increased over 45% in 19^6. . . . Musical education is but one phase of NBC*s great "editorial section," the sustaining programs which make up 73.7% of all

broadcasts furnished by NBC "in the public interest."

INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE

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abroad and

Each year, when thousands of music lovers make their pilgrimage to Salzburg, Austria, only NBC brings its Music Festival to America.

At the renowned Festspielhaus (right) famous conductors lead Europe's great orchestras in symphony concerts; noted singers appear in the world's favorite operas, and NBC listen- ers sit in the royal box. Wherever great music Is to be heard, NBC is there.

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(Left) Bruno Walter, noted conductor of several concert broadcasts in 1936, takes a curtain call with featured members of the cast of "Don Giovanni."

In NBC's Radio City Studios, Dr. Damrosch conducts the NBC Symphony Orchestra (above) and explains the compositions; and in more than 70,000 radio-equipped schools, pu- pils listen attentively each Friday to his Music Appreciation Hour, an important part of their musical education.

At a luncheon in honor of his 7.')th birthday given by David Sarnoff, president of RCA, Dr. Damrosch was at his happiest when these youngsters gathered about him.

'^f ^ H K Music ApjM-ecianiin H'lur, an » cxclusi\cNIK tfarurcconviucred bv Dr. Walter Damrosch, is uith-ur vi-uin the most \viilcl> hcarti musical educa- tion program tor school chikiren. It cjuired listening tor some ~,C'00,oc>c >tu- dents who tollovv the \veekl\ "les>"n^'* guide(i h\' notebooks and manuals sup- plied to the schools In NlK's Mu>c Education Department and heard In halt again as man\ adult listener>

The love ot fine music, encuuragetl In this antl similarK consrructi\e educa tional periotls, is increasing the audience tor such important pn>grams as the Salz- burg Music l^'estual, describeii on the preceding page. So great is the demand for better music that the time de\ oted to classical comjtositions on NHL program- increased o\er4;' , in i<),;(k . . . Musical education is but one jiha^e of \ IK s great "editorial section," the >ustaining programs which make up ~^~^\' ot all

broati casts turnislieti d ^ ^H In NBC "in the public

interest."

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(Left) "Vic and Sade," comedy serial of home life, is a popular NBC daytime proj^ram. Rush, Sade and Victor Gook are portrayed by Billy Idelsou, Bernar- dine Flynn and Art Van Harvey. (Below) Two of the cast of NBC Radio Guild portray a dramatic situa- tion. The Guild presents Shakespeare's plays, classic dramas, and specially prepared radio dramatizations of historical events.

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Presentation of awards for the best play and best motion picture of the year are exclusive NBC features. In 1936 Robert Sherwood, repre- senting the New York newspaper movie critics, awarded "The Informer" with Victor McLaglen the gold medal which was accepted by Mrs. M. H. Aylesworth for RKO-Radio Pictures. In the same year, the New York Drama Critics Circle awarded Maxwell Anderson (right) its gold plaque for "Winterset" starring Burgess Mere- dith and Margo who later appeared in the RKO-Radio picturization of the play.

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(Above) Ethel Barrymore, "first lady of the American stage," brings her program, "The Famous Actors' Guild," before NBC Blue Network microphones weekly in re- vivals of plays in which she starred on the stage. (Right) Irene Rich, appearing in the dramatic serial "Lady Counselor," was one of the first screen stars to be presented regularly on NBC networks. Cornelia Otis Skinner's delightful character sketches are now a regular NBC feature.

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a stage . .

No group of Americans ever "held the mir- ror up to nature" with greater success than America's topliners who nightly play to audiences of many millions over NBC Net- works. Famous hits of Broadway have brought laughter and tears from Lake O' the Woods to Cajin' Land as Shakespeare's immortal lines

have thrilled new millions on land and sea. Thirty-five per cent of all sponsored programs during 1936 used either drama or comedy drama as a central theme, proving once again the power of the spoken word. A few of the high dramatic moments of the past year are recalled on these pages.

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"We, the People" brings persons from all walks of life before the microphone to recreate dramatic moments in their lives. Voted 1936's outstanding new program idea by Hearst newspapers' radio editors, "We, the People" is produced by Phillips Lord (circle). (Left) Edgar A. Guest in "Welcome Valley." (Extreme left) Warden Lewis E. Lawes in "20,000 Years in Sing Sing."

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INTENTIONAL SECOND EXPOSURE

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(;4boie) Ethel Barrymore, "first lady of the American stage," brings her program, "The Famous Actors' Guild," before NBC Blue Network microphones weekly in re- vivals of plays in which she starred on the stage. [Riiht) Irene Rich, appearing in the dramatic serial "Lady Counselor," was one of the first screen stars to be presented regularly on NBC networks. Cornelia Otis Skinner's delightful character sketches are now a regular NBC feature.

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(Le/n "Vic and Sade," comedy serial of home life, is a popular NBC daytime program. Rush, Sado and Victor Cook are portrayed by Billy Idelson. Bernar- dine Flynn and Art Van ilarvt-y. lieloui Two of the cast of NBC Radio Guild portray a dramatic situa- tion. The Guild presents .Shakespeare's plays, classic dramas, and specially prepared radio dramatizations of historical events.

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Helen Hayes is one of NBC's featured dra- matic stars in her "Bambi" series.

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Presentation of awards for the best play and best motion picture of the year are exclusive NBC features. In 1936 Robert Sherwood, repre- senting the New York newspaper movie critics, awarded "The Informer" with Victor McLaglen the gold medal which was accepted by Mrs. M. II. Aylesworth for RKO-Radio Pictures. In the same year, the New York Drama Critics Circle awarded Maxwell Anderson ri<j.ht its gold plaque for "Winterset" starring Burgess Mere- dith and Margo who later appeared in the RkO-Radio picturization of the play.

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tO group of Americans ever "held the mir- ror up to nature" with greater success than America's topHners who nightly phiy to audiences of many millions over NBC Net- works. Famous hits ot Broadway have brought laughter and tears trom Lake ()' the Woods to Cajin' Lantl as Shakespeare's immortal lines

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have thrilled new millions on land and sea. Thirty-five per cent of all sponsored programs during 1936 used either drama or comedy drama as a central theme, proving once again the power of the spoken woni. A few of the high dramatic moments of the past year are recalled on these pages.

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"We. the People" brings persons from all walks of life before the microphone to recreate dramatic moments in their lives. Voted I9.?6's outstanding new program idea hy Hearst newspapers' radio editors, "We. the Peoplt" in produced by Phillips Lord cinli'). (Left Kdfiar A. (iuest in "Welcome Valley." [Extreme left ^ Warden lewis K. I awes in "20,000 Years in Sing Sing."

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M. Robert Jardillier, French Minister of Com- munications (right), ac- companied by Fred Bate, NBC British representa- tive, speaks from Ameri- can Air Liner NC- 16030.

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From his office high up in the RCA Building in Radio City, David Sarnoff, presi- dent of the Radio Corpora- tion of America, opened the international 4-way radio conversation.

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Aboard his yacht, the "Elettra," off Genoa, Italy via Italo Radio, Rome Senatore Marconi joined in, while America and Europe eavesdropped.

A PERFECT example of coordination of radio facilities was /l^ this unique feature of NBC's Tenth Anniversary week— a 4-cornered conversation across the world— from air-to-land- to-sea. Two visiting European radio executives, M. Robert Jardillier, French Minister of Communications, and M. Maurice Rambert, President of the International Broadcasting I'nion, en route in two planes from Buffalo to Washington, exchanged greetings with David Sarnoff in the RCA Building and with Senatore Guglielmo Marconi, on his yacht "Elettra" near Genoa.

"This is an amazing conversation," said Marconi, the father of modern radio. And so it was. The entire program was broadcast in the United States over 8o NBC Red Network Stations, relayed by NBC and RCA Communications shortwave trans- mitters to Europe where it was rebroadcast in Germany, Den- mark, Austria, France, Switzerland and Czecho-Slovakia.

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A PFRFKCT example of coordination of" radio faL-ilirics vsas ^^ this unique feature of" XHC's Tenth Anniversarv week - a 4-cornered conversation across the world -from air-to-land- to-sea. Two visiting Kuropean radio executives, M. Robert Jardillier, French Minister of Communications, and M. Maurice Ramhert, President of the International Bnuidcastinir lni..n, en route in two planes from Buffalo to Washington, exchanged greetings with David Sarnoff in the RCA Building and with Senatore Guglielmo Marconi, on his yacht "Elettra" nearCienoa.

"This is an amazing conversation," said Marconi, the father of modern radio. And so it was. The entire program was broadcast in the United States over 8o \BC Red Network Stations, relayed by NBC and RCA Communications shortwaxe trans- mitters to Europe where it was rebroadcast in (iermany, Den- mark, Austria, France, Switzerland and Czecho-Slovakia.

Aboard a chartered tug, NBC officials and announcers accompanied liner through the Narrows, broadcast account of her arrival over nationwide NBC network.

WHEN the great liner, R.M.S. Queen Mary, sailed on her trial run, NBC brought the first broadcast from the mighty ship to American listeners. On her maiden voyage to New York, the Queen Mary was wired for sound from stem to stern as NBC broadcast frequent programs throughout the run, and upon her arrival in New York har- bor. Less than one hour after docking, the Queen Mary's commander, the late Sir Edgar T. Britten (below with Roger Eckersley, Brit- ish Broadcasting Corporation official) broad- cast from the National Broadcasting Com- pany's Radio City studios an account of his ship's first crossing.

{Left) John B. Kennedy, NBC commen- tator, and George Hicks, NBC announcer, introduced the world's greatest ship to all America as she steamed into New York harbor at the end of her voyage.

(Above) When the Queen Mary came up the harbor accompanied by a great fleet of welcoming craft, NBC carried the scene and sounds into the homes of mil- lions of listeners.

Margo, Mexican star of "Winter- set," is interviewed by Francisco J. Ariza, editor of Cine-Mundia!, movie magazine circulating in Central & South America.

Making its first direct radio pick-up from Nanking, China, on December 17, 1936, NBC broadcast the speech of Dr. H. H. Kung, Finance Minister. He spoke on the kidnaping of Chiang Kai-Shek, then front page news.

World Traveler

WHEREVER things happen, NBC micro- phones are on the job! To travel half-way round the world to bring to America news of some history-making event is not uncommon. Guided by NBC microphones, the American listener, at his own fireside, travels the world.

And now, through its improved shortwave facili- ties, NBC brings North America and South America within mutual voice-range. In the fall of 1936 NBC began regular program service to Latin America, competing with European radio organizations which previously dominated the field. Six programs a week are now broadcast, with increased service already being planned. Increased coverage of